sharing the joy of making since 2014

Abigail in the yeiou {paper objects} studio

Hi, I’m Abigail! I’m the maximalist responsible for this workspace you see above. That’s my desk, where I spend  lots of time scheming, dreaming, and wrangling computerized cutting machines. I am a designer and paper engineer. I love to push the boundaries of what can be accomplished with card stock and double-stick tape.

Why?

I’ve been folding paper and testing its structural capabilities since I was a small child. I was obsessed with origami, and spent hours pouring over all of the origami books I could convince the local library to lend me. I labored over little paper boxes, balloons, animals, and geometric shapes. In college, as I studied graphic design and web design, I also explored modular origami.

After some time in the corporate world, doing web design and online marketing, I realized that I needed to pivot back toward working with tangible objects and non-digital materials. A friend wisely pointed out that through all of the tight deadlines and long hours, one of my strategies for coping with stress was to return to some of the origami models that I’d memorized as a small child. I found such relief in taking my hands off the keyboard for a minute or two, that I’d end up with piles of tiny origami things on my desk as a correlation to my stress levels.

All of my kits are designed with that sense of relief in mind. Yeiou papercraft kits and projects allow you to access that moment of escape and tangible productivity, without the trip to the library and hours understanding origami instructions. It’s 10-minute-or-less counterpoint to a world full of unanswerable questions and increasing complexity!

What does “yeiou” mean?

Yeiou is a completely made-up word. You can spell it out, you can pronounce it “yai-you”, I like to say it rhymes with “hi, you!” It’s a word that I invented years and years ago, riffing off of the little vowel memory tool I learned as a child: “a-e-i-o-u and sometimes y”. On a whim, I thought it would be interesting to “promote” the “sometimes y” to take over the first spot. I liked that it looked sort of familiar, but also sort of mysterious.

Then, when I started developing products and thinking about a paper-focused business, “yeiou” was a way to capture the intrigue of the process of transforming a weirdly-shaped flat piece of paper into an interactive three-dimensional object – something totally different!